‘Kiwi’ nickname not discriminatory, Australian tribunal finds

Get real time updates directly on you device, subscribe now.

'Kiwi' nickname not discriminatory, Australian tribunal finds

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption The term "Kiwi" is derived from the name of a New Zealand bird

A New Zealand woman has unsuccessfully argued that she was a victim of racial discrimination after being labelled a "Kiwi" by her colleagues in Australia.

Julie Savage said she was disrespected when her boss and co-workers referred to her as "Kiwi" instead of her name.

However an Australian tribunal ruled that she had not suffered unfair treatment or discrimination at work.

A judge noted that the term was commonly used by New Zealanders themselves.

"Calling a New Zealander a 'Kiwi' is not of itself offensive. 'Kiwi' is not an insult," said Judge Leonie Farrell.

She added that the word was often viewed as a "term of endearment".

It is derived from the name of a flightless bird native to the country.

You might also be interested in:

  • Sacked vegan claims discrimination
  • 'Kwaussie' named Australia's word of 2017
  • Is Australia and NZ 'mateship' in trouble?

Ms Savage said the issue had prompted her to resign from her job as a supervisor at Vili's Cakes, a bakery in Adelaide, in 2016.

She later lodged a complaint with the South Australian Employment Tribunal.

But it found no evidence that discrimination laws had been violated.

"[She] did not allege that she suffered unfavourable treatment in respect of the terms of her employment, lack of progression or segregation," Ms Farrell said.

"At its core [her complaint] is not about racism."

The bakery's owner, Vili Milisits, told local media that the "right outcome" had been reached.

Get real time updates directly on you device, subscribe now.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.