Norfolk hospital children ‘reassured’ by Medibears

Get real time updates directly on you device, subscribe now.

Norfolk hospital children 'reassured' by Medibears

Media playback is unsupported on your device
Media captionThe teddy bears have their own crutches, bandages, cannulas and more

A tea party and crowd funding has raised £200 to buy teddy bears to show young hospital patients what happens during their treatment.

Staff at Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital bought the bears for children worried about medical procedures.

Toy medical devices are fitted to the soft toys to calm patients, especially those with learning disabilities.

Five Medibears are fitted with devices such as hearing aids, cochlea implants, bandages and pacemakers.

Image copyright NNUH
Image caption The bears are fitted with devices and dressings to show children what will happen during their treatment

Emma Chapman, children's services matron, said: "The Medibears will support the work undertaken with children and young people with a learning disability when being prepared for specific procedures and to help them better understand what is going to happen to them.

"They are a very welcome addition to the other resources available and will enhance the work already being undertaken by our hospital play team and nursing teams."

Image caption Fiona Springall with Natalie, 10, who was being treated for a kidney infection and is pictured holding a Medibear and her own favourite soft toy

Fiona Springall, a children and young person's learning disability specialist nurse, said: "The bears help to normalise medical equipment and help to reduce any worries they may have.

"Children can see and examine the bear and that helps them feel comfortable about having their procedure done."

The money was raised by Sue Phillips, a member of staff, and her events also included a raffle.

Image caption Tegan, 10, has type 1 diabetes with her step-mother Cat Turley examining one of the Medibears

Cat Turley, who was visiting her 11-year-old step-daughter Tegan who was being treated for type 1 diabetes, said the idea of having Medibears to hold and to examine was "fantastic".

"The Medibear is something that can be seen as being in the same situation as them and they can play with it," she said.

"That gives them more confidence in what can be a scary situation for a child."

Get real time updates directly on you device, subscribe now.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.